Oven-Baked Ham and Mushroom Pizza

Oven-baked ham and mushroom pizza

I still remember the warm summer’s day when I first baked a home-made pizza. It tasted fantastic, fresh flavours and a crisp thin-crust base, served with both a glass of wine and a sweet sense of victory. And the desire to make many more. Which I did.

This post covers the basics with a ham and mushroom pizza using home-made dough. From this foundation, it’s easy to make most pizzas.
Continue reading“Oven-Baked Ham and Mushroom Pizza”


Ham and Mushroom Pizza

2 hours prep (mostly unattended)
8 mins cooking
Medium
2-4 servings
Cabernet Sauvignon/Merlot

Equipment

  • Pizza stone
  • Measuring jug
  • Mixing bowl
  • Timer (kitchen, phone app)
  • Wooden chopping board
  • Kitchen cloth or plastic carrier bag
  • Kitchen scales
  • Baking parchment
  • Pizza wheel or sharp scissors
I strongly recommend using a pizza stone. My home-baked pizzas jumped in quality as a result of using one instead of a standard baking tray.

Ingredients

Pizza Dough

Makes dough for two large (14-15 inch) or three smaller thin crust pizzas (8-10 inch). Leftover dough can be bagged in portion sizes and kept in the fridge for a couple of days or frozen for up to one month.

  • 500g ’00’/Pizza flour plus a little extra for kneading
  • 50g semolina
  • 350 ml warm water (250 cold + 100 boiling)
  • 1 sachet dry instant yeast (or 2 tsp from a jar)
  • 2 tsp granulated sugar
  • 2 tsp salt

If you don’t have ’00’ flour, use 250g strong white and 250g plain flour. Having experimented with flours though, ’00’ flour does seem to make better pizza dough.

Toppings

  • Shredded ham and/or smoked lardons
  • Sliced mushrooms
  • Mozzarella
  • Passata
  • Basil
Pizza dough with topppings ready to bake

Method

Pizza Dough

The pizza dough is made using the same minimal knead method for making bread.

  1. Put dry ingredients in bowl. Add water, mix together into a dough ball. Cover bowl.
  2. Rest the dough in the bowl for 20 mins. Go do something else.
  3. Stretch and knead dough on lightly oiled surface for 15 seconds. Return to bowl, cover.
  4. Repeat previous two steps two more times, kneading on a lightly floured surface.
  5. Divide the dough in ball shaped portions.
    • If you’re not going to use all the dough balls in one cook, the remainder can be bagged and placed in a fridge for a few days, or in a freezer for up to a month. Letting the dough prove in a fridge for an extended period does improve the flavour.
  6. Rest the dough ball(s) in a covered bowl or tray until they have doubled in size, takes 45-60 mins.

Preparing and Baking the Pizza

Oven temperature for cooking can be up to 275°C/525°F, for the first pizza though go for 220°C/430°F and get hotter with subsequent pizzas. It’s easy to cook an underdone pizza for a bit longer, but impossible to recover a burnt pizza.

  1. Pre-heat the oven with the pizza stone in it to desired temperature.
  2. Fry sliced mushrooms and lardons in a frying pan. Dry using kitchen towel and set aside.
  3. Shape some dough into a pizza base, transfer to baking parchment. See the hints, tips and pictures section for how to do this.
  4. Add toppings – passatta first, then cut mozzarella, ham/lardons and mushrooms.Add some more mozzarella on top for the full cheese experience.
  5. Transfer pizza to the pizza stone in the oven.
  6. Bake for 8 minutes, until the crust is golden brown.
  7. Remove pizza from the oven, discard baking parchment.
  8. Garnish with basil, cut and serve.
Hot pizza fresh from the oven

Hints, Tips and Pictures

Make Dough The Day Before

Pizzas are better if the dough is made the day before and stored overnight in a fridge (or even for two days). Simply remove the dough from the fridge 2-3 hours before it is used and let it warm up to room temperature.

Pre-Heating The Pizza Stone

Having a long pre-heating time for the pizza stone and baking at higher temperatures of up to 275°C/525°F results in better pizzas. Ensure that your pizza stone can handle high temperatures.

Toppings and Soggy Pizzas

The easiest way to make a pizza base soggy is to overload with toppings. For the passata base, spread lightly and evenly using a kitchen spoon.

Use a spoon for even spread of the passata

Toppings that have natural fluid retention, e.g. pineapple, peppers, onions and mushrooms, also contribute. Dry them before layering onto the pizza.

Shaping The Pizza

The video clips below show a few methods of how pizza dough can be shaped:

Shaping takes a bit of practice, if you find it’s not shaping well and the dough starts to resist/tear, rest the dough for 15 minutes and try again.

I use the rolling-pin method for thin crust, rolling the dough on a surface with polenta/cornmeal and some flour. The polenta gives the base a nice crunch, just use flour if you prefer a non-crunchy base.

Rolling the dough on a surface with polenta and flour

Using Baking Parchment to Transfer Pizza

I have found that sometimes pizza dough can stick to pizza peels, so for oven pizzas I use baking parchment instead (not greaseproof paper – this will stick to the pizza), cutting it to shape using the pizza stone as a template.

Cut out a template of baking parchment
Place and roll out shaped dough on the parchment

Once the base is shaped, transfer it onto baking parchment. This makes it easy to transfer the pizza onto the stone in the oven, especially if you have a pizza peel. The parchment can be slid out from underneath the pizza after 2-3 minutes.

Use a pizza peel to slide the baking parchment into the oven

2 thoughts on “Oven-Baked Ham and Mushroom Pizza

  1. Ben Wilcox

    Great looking pizza. When rolling out dough, I would only use flour (same as dough). Using palenta or corn meal will result in the cornmeal blending with the dough/crust. A good dough will not require much flour on the surface. The only time I would use corn meal is a pinch on a peel to allow the pizza to slide on to the stone. Ben

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi Ben … I like the texture of pizza that has a little cornmeal blended into the dough. I got the idea from Diners, Drive-ins and Dives when Guy Fieri went to Backroad Pizza. As he said, “I’m a cornmeal crunch kinda guy.” But it is optional of course, it can be left out.

      I’ve updated the blog article to make this clear. Thanks for stopping by.

      Like

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